11.08.10

Stopping Senior Illnesses Before they Happen

Posted in Assisted Living, Dialysis Assisted Living, Dimentia, Elder Care, elderly and education, Elderly Care, Elderly Diseases, pain releif, Senior Citizen, Taking Care of a Loved One at 11:07 am by admin

Seniors are living longer, healthier, and better lives thanks to public awareness, elderly care research, and a proactive shift to preventative medicine. Many of the following deadly illnesses can be prevented or managed with a healthy lifestyle and early medical intervention.

1. Heart Disease
Heart disease includes heart failure, heart attack, and arrhythmia, which impair the heart’s ability to beat regularly and effectively, impacting blood circulation. Heart disease is often found in conjunction with other conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, poor diet, and lethargy. Genetics also plays a roll in heart disease.

Heat disease prevention begins with sticking to a healthy diet and regular exercise regime as well as quitting smoking. Quickly identifying and treating potential health risks and complicating factors such as diabetes, and high blood pressure can go a long way to reducing your risks of having potentially serious heart disease. Check with your doctor if you are concerned about any of the above or if heart disease runs in your family.

2. Cancer
The types of cancers affecting seniors vary from colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, to skin cancer. The older a person gets, the more susceptible they are to developing any of the above cancers.

Prevention of cancer is still being heavily researched, and many scientists and doctors disagree on the best course of action to prevent cancer, but most will agree that catching cancer earlier rather than later allows time for treatment and increases your chances of survival. Annual check-ups may be your best defense.

3. Stroke (cerebrovascular disease)
The loss of speech, muscular control, or vision is cause by a stroke, also called cerebrovascular disease. A stroke is usually caused by a blood cot which either prevents blood flow to the brain or causes the brain to hemorrhage.

Prevention of strokes is tricky, but science tells us that seniors with high blood pressure or diabetes have an increased risk of having a stroke. Keeping those risk factors under control may be the best way to prevent a stroke. Also, catching early warning signs, such as a mild stroke, may give you and your doctor a strategy for preventing a major stroke.
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4. COPD
That irritating cough that just won’t go away, may not just be irritating if it’s due to COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). This disease is often associated with heavy cigarette smoking or long-term exposure to air-born toxins and starts with a deep cough and mucus in the lungs.

Prevention of COPD may be as clear cut as stopping smoking or avoiding toxic working environments. Treatments may include inhalers or surgery to alleviate symptoms.

5. Pneumonia
Cold and flu season, during the winter, is one of the most likely times for seniors to contract pneumonia, an infection or inflammation of the lungs. Pneumonia really becomes deadly when it’s combined with other chronic diseases.

The pneumococcal vaccine may prevent some types of bacterial pneumonia, and the flu shot may also prevent one type of viral pneumonia. Otherwise just avoiding gatherings during the peak of cold and flu season, washing hands before eating and after returning home. Physical and breathing exercises may also help improve your lung capacity. Avoid smoking and second-hand smoke. When using chemicals, wearing a mask and protective clothing and working in a well ventilated area may prevent aspiration pneumonia.

6. Diabetes: Type II
Type II Diabetes is also known as adult onset diabetes, and is a metabolic disorder that affects the way your body responds to insulin and stores sugar (energy). The many long-term complications from diabetes are what make it so deadly since they can affect the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, immune system, and nerves. The risk of heart attack is dramatically increased for people with this type of diabetes.

Prevention of Type II Diabetes lies mostly in correctly managing it to avoid the serious complications associated with the disease. Diet and exercise are key for managing diabetes.

7. Accidents
Accidents are not an illness, obviously, but they become a big deal when you’re a senior. Slowed reaction, decreased muscle control, and brittle bones contribute to the danger of senior accidents whether it’s a fall at home or a car crash.

Preventing accidents could be as easy as knowing your physical limitations and asking for help.

8. Septicemia
Septicemia includes any major infection that enters the bloodstream, poisoning the entire body.

Seniors should be quick to go to the doctor if they have fever, shaking chills, changes in mental status, or bleeding into the skin. The doctor may be able to localize and treat infections quickly, preventing serious major infections that lead to septicemia. Also, having flu and pneumococcal vaccines reduce a senior’s risk of developing septicemia.

9. Nephritis
Nephritis is better known as kidney disease. Nephritis is caused by toxic chemicals, bacterial infections, or alcohol abuse, which damage our body’s filtering system, the kidneys.

10. Alzheimer’s Disease
More and more attention is being turned toward Alzheimer’s Disease since complications associated with the disease can be deadly. Alzheimer’s causes loss of memory, mental reasoning, and eventually motor skills and organ function.

Alzheimer’s Disease does not have a cure, and more research needs to be done to define better treatments, but most experts agree that maintaining a healthy lifestyle with healthy diet and exercise will help, and being proactive by quickly seeking medical help may reduce your risk of developing the disease or at least slow the symptoms.

Awareness and healthy living will go a long way to protecting you or the senior you love from becoming a casualty of one of these ten illnesses. If you are looking for FL assisted living, or senior housing around the country, use the search bar at the top of the page.

08.17.07

Fall Injury Preventatives

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease, arthritis, Assisted Living, Assisted Living Safety, care at home, Elder Care, Elderly Care, Elderly Diseases, exercises, Home Health Care, pain releif, Senior Citizen, soothes joints at 3:42 pm by admin


Elder Care Safety

Falls are the most common cause of injury in American adults age 65 and older. According to the National Safety Council falls are the leading cause of death. One in three of those 65 and older falls each year and 90% of hip fractures that occur in the U.S. are the result of a fall.


But do not panic over these statistics. Here are a few things to do to fall-proof your home and to learn how to fall the correct way to help prevent injury.

To fall proof your home:

  -Don’t pile clutter or items in pathways or stairways.

  -Put adhesive texture strips or a rubber mat on the bottom of shower. Install grab bars on the walls. Place a slip resistant rug on the floor to safely get in and out of bath.

  -Keep appliance cords out of walking area. Don’t put them under rugs.

  -Remove small area rugs at top and bottom of stairs and put adhere non-slip treads to bare-wood steps.

  -Place night lights to light the way from bedroom to bathroom.  Keep a flashlight with new batteries close to the bed in case of power outage.

  -Clean up spills immediately.

  -Wear sneakers around the house and outside. Do not wear stocking feet or high heals.

In case a fall does happen here are a few steps to follow to do avoid or minimize injury:

  -If at all possible try to fall on your butt or side. Roll over naturally, turning your head in the direction of the roll.

  -Keep joints (wrists, elbows and knees) bent. Do not break your fall with your hands or elbows.

  -After falling take several deep breaths. Do not quickly get up especially if you feel you have been injured.

  -If you feel you have been injured call 911 or a family member for help.

  -If you feel you are not injured and are able to get up, crawl to a stable piece of furniture like a chair to support and help pull yourself up. Put both hands on the seat.

  -Slowly begin to raise yourself up and bend whichever knee that is stronger keeping the other knee on the floor. Slowly twist and sit in the chair.

Remember to have physical checkups and exercise regularly.


07.31.07

Water Therapy

Posted in arthritis, Assisted Living Referral Service, Assisted Living Safety, Elder Care, Elderly Care, exercises, osteoporosis, pain releif, soothes joints, water exercises, water therapy, water therapy for elderly at 5:17 pm by admin

Water therapy, a good excercise for the elderly


A great way to excercise

Water Therapy is said to be the best form of exercise for the elderly. Water therapy is easy on the bones which is especially good for those with Osteoarthritis and Osteoporosis. Water therapy warms and soothes the joints and increases range of motion. Water therapy conditions and builds the muscles yet it releives a lot of pain. Many poeple with back pain start doing water exercises to relieve that pain whereas weight workouts would likely increase the pain.

Hard and padded surfaces uncomfortable

Many people find that as they age exercising on hard or even padded surfaces is very uncomfortable but water exercises are enjoyable and a nearly painless workout. If a person has a muscle strain or tear, has had a fall or other injury then the gentle resistance and friction that water therapy provides makes a quicker recovery while reducing the risks of re-injury due to loss of balance or overstraining the bones and muscles. 

Consult your physical therapist

Those with high blood pressure and other heart related problems should consult their physical therapist before performing water therapy.

If you or a loved one has arthritis then begin water therapy that works for you as soon as possible to get rid of pain and stiffness.